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Field Bindweed
04/28/2017
 

One of the more frustrating weeds for homeowners is field bindweed. KSU Horticulture Specialist Dr. Ward Upham recently broke field bindweed control down in to three categories: vegetable gardens, lawns, and shrub beds. A summary of his suggestions are included below!

Bindweed in the garden is not only difficult to control, but typically requires taking the treated portion of the garden out of production for a time. For best results, use a product containing Glyphosate on bindweed in the unplanted area when it is at or beyond full bloom (earlier treatments are okay, but don’t skip the late summer/fall application!). Bindweed needs to be growing well for best results. Glyphosate is non-selective, meaning it will kill whatever it hits. It is, however, inactivated when it comes in contact with soil, so residual is not an issue.

In lawn situations, a number of herbicides products are available that include the active ingredient quinclorac for bindweed control. Quinclorac products work better than glyphosate and are selective, meaning they can be sprayed on turf and not cause damage. Do not use clippings from the turf in compost or mulch due to the herbicide contained in them. If bagged, discard them! Avoid application over the exposed roots of trees and ornamentals and it would probably be best to avoid spraying beneath the canopy of any trees to avoid possible damage. Do not use quinclorac in the garden!

Control in shrub beds will require spot treatment of glyphosate between plants. Shields must be used to keep spray from contacting green plant material. Remember, glyphosate will hurt your shrubs if it contacts green tissue. Bindweed can be controlled by pulling, but persistence is a must! According to a study Dr. Upham saw from the 1940’s, bindweed produces enough energy to start strengthening the roots when it reached the six-leaf stage. Knowing that, if pulling is how you are going to control, never allow plants to produce more than six leaves.

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