Sunday, 27 May 2018
Login |  Register 
 
Find Products or Services in your local community
 
MSC News National Headlines U.S Health Tech Talk World Business Sports Top Headlines
Veterinary Researcher Makes Inroads in Fighting Classical Swine Fever
02/07/2018
 

A Kansas State University researcher has licensed a new vaccine to an animal health company to fight a highly contagious swine disease overseas. A second discovery by the researcher could improve vaccines for the disease and help protect the U.S. from an outbreak.

Jishu Shi, professor of vaccine immunology and director ofU.S.-China Center for Animal Health in the university's College of Veterinary Medicine, has developed a method of producing a classical swine fever vaccine safely and inexpensively. The disease can cause devastating epidemics among pigs if left unchecked.

Shi's vaccine uses a protein from the virus rather than a live or attenuated virus, which means the vaccine poses no biosecurity risk to produce in the U.S., where classical swine fever was eradicated in 1978.

Shi licensed his new subunit vaccine to an animal health company in China to continue to study its field efficacy. Classical swine fever has not been eliminated in China, and each of the 700 million pigs raised annually in the country currently receives two doses of vaccine against the virulent disease. Shi's version requires only one dose.

"We need to test the vaccine in the field to prove it will work," Shi said. "If it does, we can help China eradicate the disease, which further secures the U.S. by ensuring the disease doesn't spread to our shores."

Pigs given the current modified live virus classical swine fever vaccine test positive for the disease. Shi's other discovery will help develop a test to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals, known as a DIVA strategy. Shi and his collaborators identified two specific antibodies that can be used to differentiate whether pigs are infected or vaccinated, and he is working with colleagues at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in Europe and in China to conduct more trials and gain full validation.

"This exciting discovery could result in solving an economic and trade problem in China — vaccines are expensive, and countries with classical swine fever can't export pork — and a security problem for the U.S.," Shi said

Peter Dorhout, Kansas State University's vice president for research, said Shi's work highlights the university's capacity for addressing high-consequence diseases.

"Our researchers develop real solutions to problems that threaten global food systems," Dorhout said. "Shi's work shows how we are expanding our reach around the world to build relationships, provide expertise and keep our food industries and supplies safe."

 

Shi conducted his research in the university's Biosecurity Research Institute, or BRI. The institute gives investigators access to a biocontainment facility in which they can safely conduct research on diseases that threaten animal, plant and human health. Shi's work was supported by a grant from the National Bio and Agro-defense Facility, or NBAF, Transition Fund.

"I couldn't do this work without the NBAF Transition Fund and the BRI," Shi said. "It gives us the competitive advantage of doing research on these diseases. This is an essential capacity, and we have a very good team there."

Stephen Higgs, director of the Biosecurity Research Institute, said Shi's work demonstrates the value of the facility, how funded research at the institute benefits the Kansas State University community as a whole, and how the institute's capabilities dovetail with the National Bio and Agro-defense Facility, which is the Department of Homeland Security's foremost animal disease research facility that is being built adjacent to Kansas State University's Manhattan campus.

"Our mission is to protect the U.S. and the world from diseases that we hope will never spread to North America," Higgs said. "Classical swine fever is one of the diseases that will be studied at NBAF, and we're proud to be supporting progress in fighting this economic threat to pork production worldwide."

 

 

You will need to be logged in to leave a comment.
Please Login

characters left

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited.
Click here to review our Terms of Use.



MOST VIEWED STORIES
Seatbelt enforcement campaign begins
Drive-by shooting leaves child injured
Thousands stolen in local financial crime
Alleged rape holds Atchison man
Theft report leads to drugs, contraband
New Holton Elementary School principal hired
Pair of scams being reported locally
KHP trooper involved in Pott Co crash
Atchison Commission approves tethering ordinances
Four arrested in Holton vehicle burglaries
Click Here For All Stories

LATEST STORIES
MO man killed in Doniphan Co motorcycle crash
Holton man sentenced for shooting at police
Stolen SUV recovered in Atchison
Sheriff's Office announces Hiawatha scholarship winners
Sheriff's Office announces Horton scholarship winners
Tree of Knowledge placed at Atchison Library
Council updated on dilapidated houses, computers
KS regulators approve merger of Westar, Great Plains
Falls City Aquatic Park set to open
Pawnee City school board meets
Click Here For All Stories

©2018 MSC News
Hiawatha, Ks 66434
EEO Public Report


Powered by Radio Media Group